Whole Wheat Dutch Baby


A Dutch Baby is a fantastic weekend treat in our house. It’s quite simple to make but requires a bit of patience while it cooks. For those of you who are new to Dutch Babies, these popovers have their roots in German cuisine and are much like a heartier baked pancake. Their high egg content makes them quite filling and high in protein. Traditionally made with sugar, these can also be prepared as a savory breakfast. Leave out the sugar and other sweet ingredients and serve it with bacon, cheddar, and tomato jam (just a suggestion 😉). One Dutch Baby serves two for a lighter breakfast or one for a stick-to-your-ribs breakfast. It can easily be doubled.

This recipe is inspired by my friends at Jubilee Farm who are growing and milling their own whole wheat as part of their CSA. Fresh whole wheat flour has a distinct nuttiness and richness that simply cannot be beat. If you can get your hands on some I highly recommend it for its higher nutritional value and superior flavor.


Whole Wheat Dutch Baby

2 eggs
1/2 cup milk
1/4 all purpose flour
1/4 whole wheat flour
2 tsp sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1 tsp cinnamon
1 pinch salt
1 Tbsp butter
Toppings of choice for serving

  1. Place a cast iron skillet or Dutch oven on the center rack of your oven. Preheat the oven to 450°, allowing the pan to heat at the same time.
  2. Meanwhile, combine all ingredients except butter in a medium bowl and whisk until smooth.
  3. When the oven has reached its temperature, add the butter to the pan. As soon as it has melted, carefully tilt the pan to coat it with the butter and quickly pour in the batter. Bake for 12-14 minutes until the Dutch Baby has puffed up and is golden on top. Serve with your favorite toppings like fresh fruit, maple syrup, and/or a dollop of yogurt. Serves two.
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Fingerling Potatoes With Wilted Chard And Leek Vinaigrette

  
We’re in the final stages of winter here in the Pacific Northwest, which means I’m craving greens and starting to look upon root vegetables with disdain. This recipe helps me bridge the gap- it’s still quite hearty with its fingerling potatoes, but the rainbow chard and leeks seem like a promise of better things to come. You’ll have leftover vinaigrette from this recipe. Luckily it’s one of my favorites and is quite versatile. I’d recommend using any leftover dressing on roasted Brussels sprouts, for dipping artichokes, or just smeared on toast. This dish would make an excellent side to roast chicken or would make a tasty brunch dish served with a couple of fried eggs.

Fingerling Potatoes with Wilted Chard and Leek Vinaigrette

1 pound fingerling potatoes, cut in half lengthwise 
4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
1 bunch rainbow chard, stem cut into bite sized pieces, leaves chopped
4 tablespoons canola, sunflower, or coconut oil, divided
1 large leek, white and light green stalk only
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
4 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup olive oil

1. Cut leek into half inch rounds. In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon canola oil over high heat. Add leeks and sauté until wilted and lightly caramelized. 

2. Add leek, mustard, vinegar and salt to a blender and puree. Then slowly pour olive oil into the blender while running. This will create a thick, smooth dressing. Set aside.

3. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 375°. Toss potatoes in 2 tablespoons of canola oil and sprinkle lightly with salt. Roast for 12-20 minutes, until easily pierced with a fork. Set aside.

4. In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon canola over medium heat. Add garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add chard stems and sauté 2-3 minutes. Add chard leaves and sauté just until wilted.

5. In a large mixing bowl, toss potatoes and chard with enough dressing to lightly coat everything. Season with salt and pepper.

Chamomile Poached Pears

 

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This recipe calls for d’anjou pears, though any firm pear will work nicely. Poaching firm pears softens them without causing them to fall apart too easily. I plan on enjoying these over my morning granola and yogurt, though I may deviate and use them to top a pound cake later in the week.

Chamomile Poached Pears

2 d’anjou pears, peeled, halved, and cored
2 cups water
2 tablespoon dried chamomile blossoms (if you don’t have any on hand, a bag of sleepy-time tea would work nicely)
4 tablespoons sugar or honey

1. Boil the water, add chamomile, and remove from heat. Allow to steep for 5 minutes.
2. Strain out the chamomile, then return the tea to a simmer. Add the sugar and stir to dissolve.
3. Add the pears to the sweetened chamomile tea and reduce heat so the pears are barely simmering. Cook covered for about 8 minutes, until the pears are easily pierced with a fork.
4. Remove the pears from the syrup and allow to cool. If you’d like, place the syrup back on the heat and allow to reduce by half. This would be nice drizzled over the pears however you choose to serve them.

Sweet Potato Rice Bowl with Watercress

  We’ve been enjoying Thanksgiving leftovers morning, noon, and night in our house and I’m ready to start thinking about tempering that with some lighter meals. This rice bowl fits the bill: it’s healthy and flavorful, but still comfort food. Perfect for a chilly evening in. The watercress adds a nice sharp bite to the dish with its peppery finish, so be sure to include plenty in your topping.

A side note in case you find yourself in a round of food trivia: did you know that what we often refer to as yams in the United States are actually sweet potatoes? Yams and sweet potatoes aren’t even related! The beautiful sweet potatoes included in this week’s CSA box are members of the morning glory family, while yams (native to Africa and Asia) are in the lily family and can only be found in specialty Caribbean and west African markets. Hope that little tidbit gives you enough points to win a round of Trivial Pursuit!

Sweet Potato Rice Bowl with Watercress

1 large sweet potato, cut into bite sized pieces 
1 small shallot, sliced
1 clove of garlic, chopped 
1 inch piece ginger, peeled and chopped
1 tablespoon white miso
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 teaspoon mirin
1 tablespoon sake (optional)
2 tablespoons sesame oil, divided
1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds
2 soft boiled eggs
Handful of watercress
2 cups cooked rice

1. Preheat oven to 400°. Toss sweet potato pieces and shallot with 1 tablespoon sesame oil. Place on baking sheet and roast until the sweet potato is fork tender, 12-20 minutes.
2. Meanwhile in a blender or mortar and pestle, combine garlic, ginger, miso, rice vinegar, mirin, sake, and remaining sesame oil. Blend until smooth and set aside.
3. Place rice in the bottom of two bowls, top with sweet potatoes, soft boiled egg, and watercress. Drizzle sauce over everything and sprinkle with sesame seeds. 

Delicata Squash Stuffing with Celery and Apples

 

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This stuffing recipe was a hit in our house this Thanksgiving and is sure to make an appearance on the holiday table again this year and for years to come. I hope you are having a lovely holiday weekend. Our home has been filled with friends and family- a welcome reminder of the bounty we are surrounded by. I am so grateful for Jubilee Farm and the amazing produce that graces our table every week. It’s truly an honor to write recipes that feature their harvests. The holidays are officially upon us. Feast and enjoy!

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Delicata Squash Stuffing with Celery and Apples

1 delicata squash, washed, seeded, and cut into large dice
1/2 pound crimini mushrooms, sliced or quartered
1 large apple, cored and cut into large dice
2 shallots, sliced
3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 cups celery, large dice
1 medium onion, large dice
Half loaf of sourdough cut into cubes (day old is great for this)
1 1/2 cups vegetable or chicken stock
Leaves from 1 branch rosemary, stripped and chopped
1 tablespoon fresh thyme (1 teaspoon dried)
1 tablespoon fresh sage, chopped (1 teaspoon dried)
1/4 cup chopped parsley

1. Preheat oven to 400°. Combine squash, mushrooms, apples, and shallots in a large mixing bowl and toss with 2 tablespoons olive oil and salt. Roast until squash is easily pierced with a fork, about 20-30 minutes. When finished cooking, remove veggies and turn oven down to 350°.
2. In a large Dutch oven, heat oil then sauté onions and celery over medium-high heat for 5 minutes. Add bread and continue cooking, stirring often for another 5-8 minutes.
3. Add roasted vegetables, stock, and herbs to the pot. Stir mixture over medium heat until the bread has absorbed most of the stock.
4. Transfer to oven with lid and bake 20 minutes, remove lid and cook for another 10 minutes. Transfer to a serving dish or place it right on the table!