Roasted Turnip and Spinach Frittata

  

Frittatas are a weekend crowd-pleaser in our house. They’re simple to make, can easily be customized according to what’s in season, and they’re super healthy. They make a great breakfast or a simple lunch. This recipe can easily be modified: substitute potatoes for the turnips, kale for the spinach, add cheese or cherry tomatoes! The possibilities are infinite!

Roasted Turnip and Spinach Frittata

1 bunch small turnips or one large turnip, washed and cut into bite sized pieces
4 tablespoons canola oil, divided
1 medium onion, small dice
2 cups spinach
8 large eggs
1/4 cup half and half
1/2 teaspoon salt
Pepper to taste

1. Preheat oven to 350°. Toss turnips with 1 tablespoon oil and roast until tender, about 10-15 minutes. Remove and set aside.
2. Combine eggs, half and half, salt, and pepper in a bowl and whisk until well mixed.
3. In a 10-inch skillet, heat remaining oil and sauté onions over medium heat until translucent. When done, add spinach and stir until wilted. Add turnips.
4. Pour the egg mixture into the skillet and cook over medium heat for five minutes. Place skillet in the oven and finish cooking, additional 15-20 minutes until set in the middle.
Allow to cool for 5 minutes before cutting and serving.

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Indian Inspired Spinach, Dandelion Greens, and Potatoes

Saag

Welcome to Week 1 of the Late Spring CSA session at Jubilee! If you’re just now beginning to follow along, take some time to explore this space. The links to the right should help you find recipes for particular ingredients. If you have any questions or just want to say hi, click the contact link above! I’d love to hear from you! If you’d like more resources or websites about local food in the Northwest, check out some of the links.

Now back to our regular programming…

Dandelion greens are a nutritional powerhouse, full of Vitamins A and C, with plenty of fiber and potassium. They cook down much like spinach, so I have combined them in this recipe. If dandelion greens are not available, double the amount of spinach. You’ll notice I’ve instructed you to leave the stems on the cilantro – this is where all the flavor is, so I like to incorporate them whenever possible. If you’re not a huge cilantro fan, just use the leaves or omit them entirely.

Ingredients:
1 bunch spinach, washed, trimmed, and roughly chopped
1 bunch dandelion greens, washed, trimmed, and roughly chopped
1 large onion, peeled and cut into a small dice
2 garlic cloves, peeled and minced
6 tablespoons butter or canola oil, divided
1 jalapeno, seeds removed & finely chopped
1/2 inch ginger knob, peeled and grated
1 teaspoon garam masala spice
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup plain yogurt
salt to taste
1 pound fingerling potatoes, cut into 1 inch pieces
1 teaspoon turmeric
1/4 bunch cilantro, roughly chopped with stems

Method:
In a medium pot, combine potatoes with enough water to cover by 1-2 inches and bring to a boil. Keep an eye on these. When they are easily pierced with a fork, they are done. Drain the water and set aside. In a large skillet (preferably cast iron), heat 2 tablespoons of butter or oil. Add turmeric, then add potatoes. Saute until slightly crispy on the outside. Remove from heat and set aside.

Meanwhile, in a large, non-stick skillet, heat the butter or oil over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, jalapeno, and ginger and saute until caramelized. This should take about 15 minutes. If it gets dry add, some water one tablespoon at a time. Add the garam masala, cumin, and coriander and cook until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Add the spinach and dandelion greens, stirring well with a pinch of salt and about 1/2 cup of water. Cook for about 5 minutes. Remove from heat, stir in yogurt, and add potatoes. Serve with basmati rice and top with fresh chopped cilantro.

Mushroom Hot Pot

Mushrooms

Clockwise from top left corner: shimeji, shiitake, enoki, green garlic, and maitake mushrooms.

Spring in Seattle is such a fickle season- one second it invites you to fire up the barbecue, the next you’re ready to snuggle up in your favorite sweater. Here’s a recipe for the rainy days. Hot pot or nabe is a Japanese style soup that is shared by many people. A large simmering pot is usually put in the center of the table and family and friends are invited to dish up from it into their own bowls as they enjoy its nourishment together. This version celebrates the mushrooms of the northwest and is a wonderful way to enjoy the emerging bounty. When we make this at home, we place an electric hot plate on the table and use it to keep the contents warm in a Le Creuset. If this isn’t an option for you, cook on your stove top and dish up into bowls when ready. This recipe serves 4 people. Note: all these ingredients are available at your local Asian market. In Seattle, I always shop at Uwajimaya in the International District.

Mushroom nabe

Ingredients:

1/2 cup mirin (Japanese cooking wine)
1/2 cup sake
1/3 cup Organic soy sauce
1/4 cup sugar
4 cups dashi or vegetable stock
1 small head Napa cabbage, cut into 1 inch pieces
1/2 pound organic firm tofu, cut into 1 inch cubes
1/2 pound shiitake mushrooms
4 ounces/1 package oyster or maitake mushrooms, trimmed and pulled apart
3.5 ounces/1 package shimeji mushrooms, trimmed and pulled apart
7 ounces/1 package enoki mushrooms, trimmed and pulled apart
3 stalks green garlic or green onions, thinly sliced
1/2 pound broccoli raab, spinach, or watercress
Optional: udon noodles or white rice, cooked and available to put into individual bowls.

Method:

  1. In a large measuring cup or bowl, combine mirin, sake, soy sauce, sugar, and dashi.
  2. In a large Le Creuset or soup pot arrange all mushrooms and vegetables, making it easy for diners to choose what they would like to dish into their individual bowls.
  3. Pour liquid ingredients into pot, cover, and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cook for 5 minutes.
  4. Transfer pot to the hot plate (set to low heat) or dining table, uncover, and enjoy with family and friends. Serve with white rice or udon noodles.